Category Archives: Office Action Analytics

Assessing a 2(d) Refusal – UNQUESTIONABLY GOOD for hard seltzer

We like to take a look at interesting 2(d) refusals. They present interesting fact patterns, and they can help us show you how to make the best use of some of TM TKO’s tools.

Today’s Refusal

Today, we are looking at an application filed by Anheuser-Busch for the mark UNQUESTIONABLY GOOD for hard seltzer. It ran into a 2(d) refusal based on a registration for the mark UNQUESTIONABLY ORIGINAL, disclaiming “original,” for beer and beer garden services, owned by District 9 Brewing Company.

The Prosecution History thus far

A-B got an initial refusal in September, filed one round of arguments in March, and got a final refusal on April 7, 2021.

Differences Between the Marks?

A-B argued at length that UNQUESTIONABLY is laudatory, and supports the second words in each mark — and that GOOD and ORIGINAL are quite different. Even though our knockout algorithms emphasize UNQUESTIONABLY quite a lot as a part of the mark, and score UNQUESTIONABLY ORIGINAL as one of the top couple of results, I’m actually very sympathetic to this argument. Because of the differences between the marks, I agree with A-B the consumers wouldn’t confuse the two marks.

The UNQUESTIONABLY ORIGINAL mark is a slogan used by the registrant — a secondary mark paired with its D9 Brewing house mark.

A-B’s real-world use of the mark is also secondary, although not as clear-cut. A-B is using the mark in plain text on their website, e.g. “…, and is filtered five times for an unquestionably good taste.” That’s not even a trademark use, but might cause problems under 2(e)(1) or “failure to function” grounds during specimen examination. The company is also using it with a video series called a “Flavor Journal,” where the “Thirsty Bartenders” vloggers and a guest come up with “Unquestionably Good” food/beverage pairings using Bud Light Seltzer. That’s probably not going to cut it as a specimen of use with the USPTO either.

Nevertheless, it seems to support the idea that neither mark is “primary” on the minds of customers — those are the BUD LIGHT and D9 BREWING marks, or possibly a secondary, beer-specific mark on the D9 side. Alas, the USPTO doesn’t consider this — perhaps examination outcomes would be more consistent and more closely matched with reality if the Office could consider the real-world centrality (or lack thereof) of a mark in its commercial context in the context of considering 2(d) refusals. It makes sense why it doesn’t — a registrant could claim secondary use in prosecution and later expand it — but it still seems like something can be done to improve results.

We took a quick look, via ThorCheck’s Term Coexistence search, at otherwise similar marks that differ in this way — one has ORIGINAL, the other GOOD. There were slim pickings in the beverage classes — SINFULLY GOOD SPIRITS! vs. ORIGINAL SIN was the best we found. Term coexistence examples like this are always a bit chance-based, since two companies have to happen to pick names that differ in exactly this way.

Differences Between the Goods?

A-B is pushing uphill here — the Examining Attorney emphasized evidence that various products use the same mark for both beer and hard seltzer, including A-B’s own Bud Light brand, Michelob Ultra, Corona, and more. Perhaps because of this, A-B did not contest the relationships of the goods in the first Office Action Response. Perhaps, also, A-B did not wish to go on record arguing that two products are not closely related — it wouldn’t want to have that quoted back to it during a later enforcement effort.

We used ThorCheck to do a comparison between “beer” and “hard seltzer.” While there are certainly examples of the same companies providing both under the same or similar marks (more on that shortly), there are also a lot of examples of similar marks co-existing.

OwnerGoodsMarkMarkGoodsOwner
Summit Brewing Company032 beerSUMMIT BREWING COMPANY
Disclaims: “BREWING COMPANY”
Reg: 3061467
Serial: 76383607
Registered And Renewed
Reg: 02/28/2006
Filed: 03/13/2002
SUMMIT SELTZER
Disclaims: “SELTZER”
Reg: 6206853
Serial: 88576621
Registered
Reg: 11/24/2020
Filed: 08/13/2019
033 hard seltzerSummit Seltzer Company LLC
DC BRAU BREWING LLC032 beerTHE CITIZEN
Reg: 4169260
Serial: 85374727
Section 8 & 15 – Accepted And Acknowledged
Reg: 07/03/2012
Filed: 07/19/2011
CITIZEN SELTZER
Disclaims: “SELTZER”
Reg: 6171247
Serial: 88730364
Registered
Reg: 10/06/2020
Filed: 12/17/2019
033 hard seltzerCitizen Cider, LLC
Mad Scientists Brewing Partners LLC032 beerEXPRESS
Reg: 3990176
Serial: 85209319
Section 8 & 15 – Accepted And Acknowledged
Reg: 07/05/2011
Filed: 01/03/2011
TROPICAL EXPRESS
Disclaims: “TROPICAL”
Reg: 6310176
Serial: 88753462
Registered
Reg: 03/30/2021
Filed: 01/09/2020
033 hard seltzerDraught Works, LLC
Vino.com, LLC032 aleNECTAR ALES
Disclaims: “ALES”
Reg: 4295409
Serial: 85664805
Section 8 & 15 – Accepted And Acknowledged
Reg: 02/26/2013
Filed: 06/28/2012
NECTAR
Reg: 6218762
Serial: 88785906
Supplemental Reg.
Registered
Reg: 12/08/2020
Filed: 02/05/2020
033 hard seltzerDivinely Nectar, Inc.
Belliveau, Justin R.032 beerGRID CITY BEER WORKS
Disclaims: “BEER WORKS”
Reg: 6257431
Serial: 87300104
Registered
Reg: 01/26/2021
Filed: 01/13/2017
GRID CITY BUBBLE WORKS
Disclaims: “WORKS”
Reg: 6171375
Serial: 88785058
Registered
Reg: 10/06/2020
Filed: 02/04/2020
033 hard seltzerGrid City Beer Works
Caldera Brewing Company032 aleASHLAND AMBER
Disclaims: “AMBER”
Reg: 3844351
Serial: 77897387
2(f) claim
Registered And Renewed
Reg: 09/07/2010
Filed: 12/18/2009
ASHLAND HARD SELTZER
Disclaims: “HARD SELTZER”
Reg: 6263853
Serial: 88642477
Registered
Reg: 02/09/2021
Filed: 10/04/2019
033 hard seltzerAshland Beverages, LLC
East Nashville Beer Works, LLC032 beerEAST NASHVILLE BEER WORKS
Disclaims: “BEER WORKS”
Reg: 5070316
Serial: 86764667
Supplemental Reg.
Registered
Reg: 10/25/2016
Filed: 09/22/2015
NASHVILLE SELTZER
Disclaims: “SELTZER”
Reg: 5958107
Serial: 88573835
Supplemental Reg.
Registered
Reg: 01/07/2020
Filed: 08/09/2019
033 hard seltzerTaylor, Kent C.
Sideways Brewing Company, LLC032 beerSIDEWAYS FARM & BREWERY
Disclaims: “FARM & BREWERY”
Reg: 5885805
Serial: 87385887
Registered
Reg: 10/15/2019
Filed: 03/26/2017
#GET SIDEWAYS
Reg: 6135704
Serial: 88787476
Registered
Reg: 08/25/2020
Filed: 02/06/2020
033 hard seltzerIslamorada Distilling LLC
The Denver Beer Company, LLC032 beerMAUI EXPRESS
Reg: 5260511
Serial: 87290760
Registered
Reg: 08/08/2017
Filed: 01/05/2017
MAUI HARD SELTZER
Disclaims: “HARD SELTZER”
Reg: 6044346
Serial: 88681927
Supplemental Reg.
Registered
Reg: 04/28/2020
Filed: 11/06/2019
033 hard seltzerKahu ‘Ohani Inc.

We also took a quick look at overlap — where the same company used the same mark for both beer and hard seltzer, just to assess the strength of the argument. Large brewers make up a lot of the results – A-B has several marks (BUD LIGHT, NATURAL LIGHT, ALOHA BEACHES), ; several smaller brewers also have registrations for both, like Great Divide (WHITEWATER), Craft Brew Alliance (OMISSION), Spruce Street (TWO ROBBERS), Detroit Rivertown (ATWATER), Montauk Bewing (MOUNTAUK). Interestingly, Kahu ‘Ohnana, mentioned above, owns registrations for MAUI BREWING CO. and MAUI HARD SELTZER that co-exist with the MAUI EXPRESS registration noted above.

We also took a look at prosecution histories to attempt to find filings for “hard seltzer” that overcame prior registrations for “beer.” Here is the search to do so, for TM TKO users. This yields a few good examples, including the aforementioned ASHLAND HARD SELTZER vs. ASHLAND AMBER (arguments, including statistically-driven arguments that most beer makers do not make hard seltzer and vice versa*). Also, the search finds some really interesting non-refusals: an A-B registration for SOCIAL CLUB did not receive a citation to some prior registrations for SOCIAL for goods including beer, notwithstanding a Letter of Protest seeking as much. SPYK’D (for hard seltzer) “ran into” a similar non-issued Office Action vs. SPIKE (for beer and booze) — a Letter of Protest was accepted but didn’t generate refusal.

* ThorCheck helps with this type of argument — its charts show that there are over 18,000 active, use-based registrations for beer vs. under 200 for hard seltzer, and only ~10 show overlap in production. Unsurprisingly, the Ashland arguments focused on the percentage of beer producers vs. the percentage of cider producers!

Application Pendency and the USPTO

The USPTO’s trademark dashboard has a variety of pendency tracking. Despite a deluge of applications, the Office has kept up, by its own metrics: new applications are largely getting examined in the usual ~3 months from filing.

However, our Office Action Analysis tool data suggests that a lot of applications that are running into 2(d) and other substantive refusals are taking longer than usual to come to a final resolution. So, we did a breakdown on application pendency time. There isn’t the time to do a totally comprehensive survey; instead, we looked at how many applications got Office Actions with 2(d) refusals in January of 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017, and 2019 to see how many went abandoned, and how quickly those that went through to publication did so.

2(d) Refusal Rates Over Time

About 20% of all applications got 2(d) refusals in each year. There were no significant changes. Obviously, with the uptick in total filings (roughly double 2009 levels), the total number of refusals is much higher.

The rates at which refused applications went abandoned without ever being published has been pretty steady over time, hovering between 50 – 55%.

Applications with minor issues

When the applicant resolves a 2(d) refusal, how quickly can they do so? In 2009, 29% of refused applications had made it through to publication within ~12 months, 37% by ~18 months, and most of the rest by 24 months. For more recent applications, it’s a very different picture. Applications overcoming a 2(d) refusal within 12 months has dropped to 21-22%, and publication rates within 2 years are down to around 33% of applications. It’s just taking longer to get to similar results.

Why is this? My guess is that the huge application volumes result in a larger registry, and more applications are getting held up on prior pending applications. So, it’s just taking longer to resolve refusals than ever before.

The raw data:

YearStatus% of Refusals
2020Pub in 1 year22%
Pub in 1.5 yearsna
Pub in 2 yearsna
Pending40%
2019Pub in 1 year22%
Pub in 1.5 years28%
Pub in 2 years34%
Pending7%
2018Pub in 1 year21%
Pub in 1.5 years29%
Pub in 2 years33%
Pending3%
2017Pub in 1 year22%
Pub in 1.5 years37%
Pub in 2 years50%
Pending0%

Have a great weekend, and a fantastic MLK Day holiday on Monday!

Are Post-Registration Audits Reducing Trademark Registry Deadwood?

Some conversation on the Oppendhal e-Trademarks listserv got us curious about the big-picture impact of the USPTO’s efforts to more aggressively audit post-registration use claims. The audit program kicked off in November 2017, and is described here. The program has been somewhat active, generating just over 12,000 Office Actions in roughly two years.

  • 2017: 798
  • 2018: 2,154
  • 2019: 5,926
  • 2020 (so far): 1,009

Audits of 1(a) registrations are slowly climbing, from 67% in 2017 to 75% in 2020; 44(e) and mixed 44(e) and 1(a) audits have remained a fairly constant 5% and 1.5% respectively, and 66(a) audits have actually dropped slightly from around 21% to around 15% of audits. Compared to overall numbers of registrations, though, registrations without 1(a) claims still get a lot more attention – both 44(e) registrations without 1(a) claims and 66(a) registrations are audited at a rate roughly twice their commonality in the registry since 2007.

Only about 550 registrations that received a post-registration audit are no longer active at all. A further 470-some registrations had audits and have fewer classes now than initially, but it’s far more complex than a blog post deserves to figure out exactly when during prosecution or post-registration each class dropped.

Since it’s hard to track whether individual goods or classes are dropped after an audit in a systematic manner, we did the next best thing and looked at a couple of random examples. Whatever the problems are with the methodology, the anecdotal research ended up being more fun anyway. The first two foreign-based registrations that I picked without a 1(a) registration basis were dramatically pared back, well beyond the audited goods or services; the two 1(a) registrations I happened to look at ended up providing additional specimens and their scope remained exactly the same. All the registrants were represented. I’m sure this stark divide would not continue over a larger sample size, and that some US-registrant-owned registrations are being sliced back quite a bit, too, but the dramatic nature of the difference really stuck out.

Example #1

MAYBANK (stylized). Reg: 4442149. Malayan Banking Berhad (Malaysian company). 44(e) registration. Class 16 and 36.

An Office Action audit requesting proof of use for “bond paper” and “plastic wrap” in Cl. 16 and “insurance claims processing” and “issuing travelers cheques” in Cl. 36. The audit prompted a response on far more than just the audited goods and services – the registrant filed a Response deleting huge swathes of goods and services, including the audited goods and more. Of the 223 words for which use was claimed in the Section 8 & 15 filing, 24 words remained after the audit process.

Paper, cardboard and goods made from these materials, not included in other classes, namely, bond paper, copier paper, graph paper, note paper, cardboard; brochures about financial services; catalogues in the field of financial services; leaflets about financial services; magazines in the field of financial services; packaging and wrapping paper of cardboard and paper; plastic wrap; plastic bags for packaging; pamphlets in the field of financial services; printed periodicals in the field of financial services; printed matters, namely, paper signs, books, manuals, curriculum, newsletters, informational cards and brochures in the field of financial services; paper articles, namely, written articles in the field of financial services; printed materials for advertising and promotional purposes, namely, printed advertising boards of paper and cardboard; paper banners; signs for advertising and display purposes, namely, printed advertising boards of paper and cardboard, paper display boxes, and display cards primarily composed of cardboard; stationery; forms, namely, blank forms, business forms, and order forms; writing pads; office requisites in the nature of pens; pencils, pens, and pencil holders in International Class 16; and
Banking; credit card services; financial evaluation, namely, financial evaluation for insurance purposes; exchanging money; financing services; investments, namely, investment brokerage, investment management, investment of funds of others; insurance, namely, insurance agency and brokerage, insurance administration, insurance claims processing; guarantees, namely, cheque guarantee card services, financial guarantee and surety services; cheque verification; issuing travelers cheques in International Class 36.

Example #2

SPANISH BREAKFAST (stylized). Reg. No. 4290593. 66(a) registration. Organización Interprofesional del Aceitede Oliva Español. Class 16, 29, 35.

Audit Office Action requesting samples of use for “postage stamps” and “pen nibs” in Class 16 and “rental of advertising space” and “services, namely, offering business management assistance in the establishment and operation of olive oil sales” in Class 35. Class 29 was not audited; the Section 8 & 15 filing already included a specimen for the sole product in that class, olive oil. The Office Action Response deleted all the audited goods and services, and quite a bit more. Of the 229 words in the ID for which a Section 8 & 15 were filed, only 59 words survived the audit process.

Books, publications, periodicals, magazines, catalogs, prospectuses, and printed matter all in the field of promoting the consumption of olive oil; newspapers; printed forms; calendars; printed tickets, posters, notebooks, note cards, envelopes and writing paper, letter trays, wrapping paper; printed matter, namely, brochures in the field of promoting the consumption of olive oil; bookbinding material; photographs, pictures, chromolithographs, paper labels; postage stamps; graphic art reproductions and representations; stationery; pen nibs, ball-point pens, pencils; adhesives for stationery or household purposes; instructional and teaching materials in the field of promoting the consumption of olive oil; plastic materials for packing, namely, plastic bags for packing; printing type; printing blocks in International Class 16

Wholesale and retail store services featuring olive oil; import and export agencies, advertising services, namely, promoting the goods and services of others; exclusive commercial and sales representation for all kinds of products, namely, promotional marketing and representation services for sale of olive oil; advertising services; dissemination of advertising matter and rental of advertising space; distributing prospectuses, directly or by mail order, and distribution of samples; business services, namely, commercial or industrial company operation or management assistance services; franchise services, namely, offering business management assistance in the establishment and operation of olive oil sales; advisor services and consultation in business management namely, business organization, business estimates, business reports and research in business matters, market studies, business information agency and import and export agencies in International Class 35

Example #3

DISNEY JUNIOR (stylized). Reg. No. 4094327. 1(a) registration. Class 41.

Audit Office Action requesting samples of use for “production, presentation, distribution of television programs” and “on-line entertainment services, namely, providing on-line computer games.” The Office Action Response provided several additional specimens for each. No services were deleted.

Example #4

ILLINOIS INDUSTRIAL TOOL. Reg. No. 3605472. 1(a) registration. Class 6, 7, 8, 9, 17, 22.

Audit Office Action requesting samples of use requesting use for a pair of goods in each class. The Office Action Response included a declaration from an executive and photos of each audited product; no goods were deleted.

What’s Going to Follow Brunetti?

The US Supreme Court has, as you’ve doubtless read a million articles about already, struck down the Section 2(a) bar on registration of “immoral [] or scandalous matter.” Iancu v. Brunetti, ___ U.S. ___ (2019). It was no surprise to anyone who had read Matal v. Tam, the 2018 decision finding the 2(a) bar on disparaging matter to be unconstitutional. 582 U.S. ___ (2017).

This blog post will take a more practical look at what applications will be impacted, using TM TKO’s searchable issue tagging.

More than five hundred applications that are currently suspended based awaiting issuance of the Brunetti decision. The following numbers show the common terms that have resulted in suspensions, and include more easily-searched spelling variations.

Fuck and variants – 173

Shit and variants – 59

Breast-related – 16

Penis-related – 71

Vagina-related – 36

Butt-related – 17

Quite a few more related to specific sex acts, although there’s too much variation for easy enough searching for the purposes of this blog post.

A bit under half of the suspended applications do not have counsel; those applicants represented by counsel were somewhat more likely than the unrepresented applicants were more likely to have multiple applications suspended awaiting the Brunetti decision.

There does not appear to have been a land rush to file new applications for offensive – yet. Application data can take a few days to a week to filter into the USPTO data set, so it’s possible that there has in fact been a profane land rush that will become apparent over the next few days.

How the Office Action Analysis Tool Helps – An Example

This blog posts looks at TM TKO’s new Office Action Analysis tool in more detail, demonstrating how it can help you build a find key prosecution data and build a strong response more quickly than ever before.

We’ll look at a recent final Office Action issued on March 22, 2019 for the mark KARMA ICE CREAM, Ser. No. 88/249,249. The application, filed by two individuals, covers a variety of frozen confections in Class 30. It raised two issues – 2(d) citations or potential citations to four prior filings, and requested a disclaimer of “ice cream.”

TM TKO Automates Research on the 2(d) Issue

Four prior registrations or applications were cited as bars: KARMA, registered in Class 30 and 42 (Reg. No. 5431756), GOOD KARMA (published in Class 30, Ser. No. 86651506) and SWEET KARMA (published in Classes 30 and 5, Ser. No. 87890908), and KARMA KOOKIES (pending in Classes 30 and 16, Ser. No. 88188680).

These citations are all listed in the “Citations” section of the report, just after the main application details. Each has a small triangle that can be expanded to show the full web of prosecution citations.

KARMA registration – cited against 4 applications, 1 published (SWEET KARMA) and 2 pending (including KARMA KOOKIES)

GOOD KARMA published app – overcame citations to two GOOD KARMAL registrations in prosecution; cited versus published SWEET KARMA and pending KARMA KOOKIES application plus an abandoned GOOD 420 KARMA application in Class 1.

SWEET KARMA – about to be registered, no citations in prosecution and only cited against KARMA KOOKIES and this application.

KARMA KOOKIES – the KARMA registration plus a whole slew of applications with KARMA; no response has been filed yet.

The Examining Attorney statistics suggest that the Examining Attorney of this application upholds initial refusals at a rate roughly consistent with the rate of the Office overall. (If the applicant was represented, you’d see attorney success rates too.)

The “Similar Acceptances” section points to helpful Office Actions overcoming comparable refusals, like two registrations for KARMA in Class 29 for differing goods with different owners, for GOOD KARMA CRUNCH in Class 30, for FRUITE KARMA in Class 29, for GOOD KARMA CAFÉ in Class 43, for KARMA KOLSCH and KARMA KOMBUCHA in Class 32 with different owners, and more. The applicants overcame 2(d) refusals based on the term KARMA with a variety of arguments and consent strategies, helping you quickly build persuasive responses on similar facts.

Just click on the magnifying glass, then “Documents,” and either click on the Office Action or response you want to see in PDF format, or click the magnifying glass again to get to a plain-text version.

Below this, the “Examiner Acceptances” section will point you to recent acceptances after 2(d) refusals for this Examining Attorney, which can provide additional insight into the types of arguments that the Examining Attorney may find especially helpful.

ICE CREAM Disclaimer Request

There isn’t a service out there that can help you from having to enter a disclaimer of “ice cream” where “ice cream” is generic for the goods, but TM TKO does help as best it can. The “Disclaimer” section is organized by term.

Clicking on KREME shows you three examples of applicants getting marks that contain KREME or close variants through on the Principal Register without a disclaimer after facing a disclaimer request, all in related classes.

This lets you rapidly view the best-case outcomes, and decide whether to pursue similar arguments. You can click on the magnifying glass and dig into the file histories of each. The registrations for NORTH FOREST KREME and KETO/// KREME, for example, both disclaim exclusive rights in “cream,” suggesting that the Examiner’s approach here is likely to hold up.

As above, clicking in on the magnifying glass to find additional details and do deep dives in file histories to learn more.

We hope the automated research provided by TM TKO’s Office Action Analysis tool is a huge boon to your practice, helping you do better legal research and drafting faster than ever before. Start playing with the Office Action Analysis tool now, and you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact us at support@tmtko.com.

Not using TM TKO yet? Sign up here.

Using Watch with Office Action Analytics

It’s simply to access Office Action Analytics for your portfolio via TM TKO’s Watch tools. Go to the “Watch” page, select “New Watch,” then select “Office Action” – or just click here.

Under “Trademark Criteria,” add some constraints to limit results to just Office Actions that you care about. You have a few options. If your email address is used in the correspondence field, that’s the simplest way to set it up.

Or, you can pair up your firm name (use “phrase” if you have a common term) and your last name. You can use a firm email extension or docketing email address plus your last name, too.

However you have yourself identified in the “Trademark Criteria,” make sure to go down to “Office Action Criteria. Select “Direction” and limit to “Outgoing” correspondence from the USPTO.

If you get an Office Action, you’ll get an email report with a link into the system. It’s just a click from there to access the file history or get to the full analytics report, as shown below.

The Office Action analytics report will give you Examiner data and selected successful responses, targeted to your facts, prevailing on similar arguments. TM TKO is the only place to find this kind of trademark research, and it’s so easy that you can’t help but do your best work.

We hope you enjoy the new tools. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to email us at support@tmtko.com.

If you are not a subscriber yet, you can try for free for 30 days at https://www.tmtko.com/signup. TM TKO is very cost-efficient: a 24 hour day pass is $75. Subscriptions start at $250 per month or $2500 per year for one seat, and include unlimited use of all search, research, and watch tools.

TM TKO launches new Office Action Analytics and Search Upgrades

TM TKO’s new Office Action analytics let you prepare smarter, better Office Action responses in less time. Our tools do the complex research for you, instantaneously. See a full example of the kind of Office Action analytics that TM TKO provides, or try it now from your Tools menu.

Issue-driven analysis: instantly provides you successful responses for similar marks for similar products or services to help you build on the successes of others. Pull any TSDR document in formatted PDF or plain-text format.

Examiner details: compare your Examining Attorney’s allowance rates on this issue with others in that Law Office and at the USPTO overall, and see recent successful responses for your issue and your Examiner.

Citation histories: do deep dives into citation histories at a click. It’s easy to understand complex webs of co-existence, assess your own chances of success, and see how the cited prior filings have interacted with other applications.

ThorCheck

Office Action analysis integrates with ThorCheck, TM TKO’s ground-breaking comparative research tool based on a precedential TTAB opinion, to find examples of co-existence of the same mark for two sets of goods with different owners. This evidence helps you push back against likelihood of confusion claims. You can also use ThorCheck to provide confusion evidence as the senior party in a Letter of Protest or opposition.

Search Upgrades

Office Action and prosecution data is now integrated across our platform.

Results in knockout search, manual search, and watch results all feature easily accessible citation data, full TSDR file histories with Office Actions and Responses tagged by issue, and quick links to prosecution analysis. Just click on the magnifying glass icon for a wealth of research options.